Book Clubs

History Book Club The next meeting of this group will be on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 7:00 p.m. The topic will be "Political Parties in America." Book Club Chair Sam Coulbourn invites you to read any nonfiction book that fits the topic.  Possible subjects include:
  • Whig
  • Know-Nothing
  • Federalist
  • Copperhead
  • Bull Moose
  • Communist
  • Socialist
  • Republican
  • Democrat
  • Green
  • Liberal
Poetry Readers
The next meeting will be on Thursday, Nov. 10, at 4 p.m. The topic will be Leavings by Wendell Berry. Copies of the book will be available at the main desk three weeks before the meeting.
 BOOKLIST REVIEW:  Berry has become ever more prophetic. The poems he collectively calls sabbaths, composed on Sundays in the woods on his farmland since 1979, occupy four-fifths of this book. If originally meditational and quiet, however serious and deep the passions they mulled over, the sabbath poems are now oracular in the mode of Isaiah, Jeremiah, and the other Hebrew prophets who enjoined their people to come to their senses and remember the Lord and his bounty, promises, and judgment. In the sabbaths of 2005-€“08 published here, Berry angrily mourns the degradation of the nation wrought by destruction of the land and the pursuit of wealth and power. He says that we must prepare to live without hope for a while, though in the very first of the sabbaths, he prays not to lose love along with hope: "Help me, please, to carry / this candle against the wind." Despite anger and bitterness, he often recalls and teaches the beauty and propriety of creation, too. If he is a Jeremiah, he is also a David the psalmist.
Current Issues Political Book Discussion Group   The next meeting will be on Wednesday, Nov. 16, at 2 p.m. The topic will be American Nations by Colin Woodard.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY: In American Nations, Colin Woodard leads us on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, and the rivalries and alliances between its component nations, which conform to neither state nor international boundaries. He illustrates and explains why "American" values vary sharply from one region to another. Woodard reveals how intranational differences have played a pivotal role at every point in the continent's history, from the American Revolution and the Civil War to the tumultuous sixties and the "blue county/red county" maps of recent presidential elections. American Nations is a revolutionary and revelatory take on America's myriad identities and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and are molding our future.
Sunday Book Chat  The next meeting will be held on Nov. 20 at 2p.m. The topic will be Romantic Outlaws by Charlotte Gordon. 
This groundbreaking dual biography brings to life a pioneering English feminist and the daughter she never knew. Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley have each been the subject of numerous biographies, yet no one has ever examined their lives in one book--until now. In Romantic Outlaws, Charlotte Gordon reunites the trailblazing author who wroteA Vindication of the Rights of Woman and the Romantic visionary who gave the world Frankenstein--two courageous women who should have shared their lives, but instead shared a powerful literary and feminist legacy.
. . . 
The private lives of both Marys were nothing less than the stuff of great Romantic drama, providing fabulous material for Charlotte Gordon, an accomplished historian and a gifted storyteller. Taking readers on a vivid journey across revolutionary France and Victorian England, she seamlessly interweaves the lives of her two protagonists in alternating chapters, creating a book that reads like a richly textured historical novel. Gordon also paints unforgettable portraits of the men in their lives, including the mercurial genius Percy Shelley, the unbridled libertine Lord Byron, and the brilliant radical William Godwin.
Monday Evening Book
Group The next meeting will not be until  Nov. 21, at 6 p.m. The topic will be When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi.
PUBLISHER'S SUMMARY:  What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir. Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. "I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything," he wrote. "Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: '€˜I can'™t go on. I'™ll go on.' "€ When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing mortality and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a gifted writer who became both.
Greek Drama Discussion Group 
The next meeting will be on Monday, Nov. 28, at 4:00 p.m. The topic will be The Phoenician Women by Euripides.

MVLC Book Club Kit Info